Is legal action the only option for Ian Gibson?

Ian Gibson, the backbencher barred from standing over his expenses claims, joins three other Labour MP’s not allowed to stand at the next general election. BBC News reports;

“MPs Margaret Moran, Elliot Morley and David Chaytor – who already said they would not stand – were also banned.

But [unlike Gibson] they have not been expelled from the party or had the whip removed.”

Iain Dale among others have agreed that only legal action will come close to overule the decision made by disciplinary panel set up by Labour’s ruling body.

This will be just great won’t it.

Top 4 anti-BNP voices

Number 4: Jesus

Amid the claims that extreme ethno-nationalism at best, the tail-end of bitter, twisted, decidedly un-British neo-nazism at worst, and ‘Christian Values’ go hand in hand, Michael Nazir-Ali reminds Telegraph readers that those claims are false, and actually Jesus

“would include all in the embrace of his Father’s love, and so change them that they begin to live for others, to meet the needs of strangers and to work for a just and compassionate society.”

And not once did Jesus mention The Christian Party during the Sermon on the Mount, with their crazy smiles posted on billboards all around London, and their opposition to referring to women as Ms (yep, look it up).

Number 3: Pete Doherty

By all accounts, his contribution to the cause was to call the BNP ‘racist c*nts’ at his gig in Stoke. Fair play.

Number 2: Zak Dingle

I’d never heard of him before I caught a glimpse of this video he made in order to steer people away from voting for the far-right nutcases (apparently he’s from Emmerdale – no relation to Iain).

Number 1: A BNP candidate

Corinne Tovey-Jones who is standing in the Nunnery Divison in Worcestershire for the BNP was outraged to find that racist material had been added – without her say so – to her campaign literature. Apparently her husband is Italian, so “how”, she asks, “can she be a racist”? Yes, I must say even I’m stumped…

Back or Sack for Darling

David Cameron, who last year told Gordon Brown to sack Alistair Darling for the handling of Northern Rock, is now asking Brown to “back [Darling] or sack him”.

Taking advantage of Brown’s indecisions on Darling, Cameron, in an interview with Sky News is jumping at the point that if Brown seems not to be backing Darling, then it appears their eyes have not always been on the economy, which I yesterday predicted.

This emerges as bloggers and journalists wonder whether this waning support for Darling is tactical before a reshuffle, noting Brown’s avowed support for Ed Balls in the treasury.

Brown has said that he does not want to stand down as PM, even after an expected election trumping on Thursday, reminding the public that he wants to stay focused on the rebuilding of the economy.

But strategically, with the dubiousness of the decision at the same time as the backing of Balls, Brown will not be able to gain support for ridding Darling, who caused fluctuations of support in the early days of the credit crisis, and later with the promises that the Brown/Darling duo could spur on stability way before city analyst’s predictions.

Certainly this will be fodder for attack, seen today in Cameron’s interview.

It seems that the only strategy, if Balls is to get the post, is for Brown to move over too, and prepare for a left-leaning Labour front team to take on Cameron’s Tories in the general election, expected next year.

News today has included the resignation of Jackie Smith as Home Secretary and three more sudden stand-downs; Patricia Hewitt’s retirement, Beverley Hughes standing down for family reasons, and David Chaytor’s leave.

Close ally to Brown, Tom Watson MP, has also decided to resign his position as minister, though he will continue to advise Gordon Brown on election strategies.

Reshuffling has not taken place yet, but already the face of our party is changing. And for better of for worse, a fresher, more progressive cabinet might just allow us a fighting chance after the drumming we – as all main parties – are about to receive this coming Thursday.